Etcetera - 9/17/12

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It's big news for Biggdaddy Ray Hansen and The Doctor, who are celebrating making it into the Inland Empire Best Blues Radio Show Blues Awards -- the seventh time in the nine years they've hosted their Blues Therapy program at KWCW Radio.

"We've yet to win, but considering that the Empire Awards are courtesy of the Inland Empire Blues Society from Spokane -- and Spokane is over 125 miles away – that's pretty amazing," wrote Ray in an email.

Ray added that Coyote Kings of Walla Walla also made the final ballot for both Best Blues Band and Best New Northwest Recording.

"We would like all our fans, who are members of the Inland Empire Blues Society, to please consider casting votes for us and for the Coyote Kings. Let's get some love for Walla Walla," Ray emailed.

"The only catch is that you must send in your $20 along with your vote so that it reaches them by Sept. 30." More details are available at bit.ly/Qs37KL.

The event will be Nov. 8 at the Spokane Valley Eagles. "Come and say 'hi' to the Blues Therapy crew and to the Coyote Kings," Ray said.

The local radio show is aired at 7 p.m. Sundays on 90.5 FM; online at www.kwcwradio.tumblr.com.


Think you know about the Walla Walla Valley's wine industry and the two-year enology and viticulture degree program offered through Walla Walla Community College?

Take a tour with correspondent John Tulenko, who gives an excellent report about it in the PBS NewsHour's story, "School of Wine: Training Students for Jobs in Washington's Wine Industry."

As evidenced in the 9-minute video, the PBS reporting team got beautiful shots of wheat, harvesting, downtown, vineyards and interviews with some of the founders of WWCC's 12-year-old wine program and current and former students.

Our state now has more than 700 vineyards, the report said, and "has become a premier location for viticulture." In addition, 80 percent of WWCC's program graduates are working in the wine industry, from vineyard managers to wine sellers.

Our own community college started the wine-making program "that fosters economic, environmental and cultural sustainability in and around the city of Walla Walla where vineyards continue to sprout."

The program can be viewed online any time at to.pbs.org/QCqXYf.

Thanks to Trey Busch, winemaker/owner at Sleight of Hand Cellars, who sent a heads up to friends and family.

Etcetera appears in daily and Sunday editions. Annie Charnley Eveland can be reached at annieeveland@wwub.com or afternoons at 526-8313.

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