Williams beats Azarenka for 5th US Open, 17th Slam

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NEW YORK (AP) — Serena Williams’ big lead in the U.S. Open final suddenly was gone.

Her serve was shaky. Her hard-hitting opponent, Victoria Azarenka, was presenting problems, and so was the gusting wind. A couple of foot-fault calls added to the angst.

As a jittery Williams headed to the sideline after dropping a set for the first time in the tournament, she chucked her racket, which ricocheted onto the court.

When play resumed, in the crucible of a third set, Williams put aside everything and did what she does best: She came through in the clutch to win a major match. Facing her only test of the past two weeks, the No. 1-seeded Williams overcame No. 2 Azarenka 7-5, 6-7 (6), 6-1 on Sunday for her 17th Grand Slam championship.

Williams has won twice in a row at Flushing Meadows — beating Azarenka in three sets each time — and four of the past six major tournaments overall. Her 17 titles are the sixth-most in history for a woman, only one behind Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert, and the same total as the men’s record-holder, Roger Federer.

“It feels really good to be in that same league as him,” said Williams, who earned $3.6 million in prize money.

This one did not come easily, even though it appeared to be nearly over when Williams went ahead by two breaks at 4-1 in the second set. She served for the match at 5-4 and 6-5 — only to have the gutsy Azarenka, a two-time Australian Open winner, break each time.

Williams is 67-4 with a career-high nine titles in 2013, but two of those losses came against Azarenka.

Williams became the first woman to surpass $9 million in prize money in a single season, while topping $50 million for her career.

She also equaled Steffi Graf with five U.S. Open titles, one behind Evert’s record of six in the Open era, which began in 1968. Williams never had won two consecutive U.S. Opens, but now she has, adding to the trophies she earned in New York in 1999 — at age 17 — then 2002 and 2008.

Those go alongside five from Wimbledon, five from the Australian Open, and two from the French Open, which she won this year.

“Being older, it’s always awesome and such a great honor, because I don’t know if I’ll ever win another Grand Slam. Obviously, I hope so,” said Williams, who turns 32 on Sept. 26. “It’s different now, because when I won earlier, it was just one or two or three or four. Now it’s like 16, 17. It has more meaning (for) history, as opposed to just winning a few.”

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