Marty Scott

Marty Scott is the astronomy instructor at Walla Walla University, and also builds telescopes and works with computer simulations. He can be reached at marty.scott@wallawalla.edu.

Recent Stories

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Rover sends clues to formation of huge mountain in Mars crater

One of the questions that puzzled mission scientists before Curiosity landed in Gale Crater on Mars was how there could be a 3.4-mile-high mountain in the middle of an impact crater.

Winter owes gratitude to celestial latitude

You may have noticed the days are getting shorter and the nights are getting longer. You may have also noticed the sun appears to be moving south, getting closer to the southern horizon each day.

Rocks leave scientist curious about a wet or dry Mars past

Data collected by the Curiosity rover are challenging our understanding of Martian geology, as members of the Geological Society of America learned last month when several presentations at their annual meeting featured analysis of these data.

Long, strange trip to comet landing for Europe spacecraft

The European Space Agency is about to pull off a first — landing a spacecraft on the nucleus of a comet.

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Solar wind shapes, colors northern lights

In the past few weeks I’ve been asked several questions about the northern lights, also called the aurora borealis. In this month’s column I will answer some of these questions and introduce you to this mysterious and unpredictable display of light in the night sky.

Mars rover survives glitches, slippery sand to destination

Curiosity has reached the base of Mount Sharp. The Mars rover’s wheels are now on material that is part of the mountain, material different from the type Curiosity landed on two years ago.

Website offers launchpad for volunteer astronomers

When you see images and hear reports from NASA missions, do you ever wish that you could be part of the team? If so, your wish may be coming true.

Sol by sol, rover makes way to Mars mountain

Curiosity still has the pedal to the metal on its journey to Mount Sharp, the layered mountain amid the crater where the Mars rover landed

Two more supermoons will brighten summer nights

If you missed the supermoon on July 12, you’ll get second and third chances to see one on Aug. 10 and Sept. 9.

Mars rover discovers curiosities on way to buttes

Mars rover Curiosity is making steady progress toward Murray Buttes, at the base of Mount Sharp. The science lab on wheels will cross the basaltic sand dune field at Murray Buttes and begin the final approach to the layered, clay-rich rocks of Mount Sharp.

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