Comment history

GeneandCassie says...

Given the renewed interest in removing the four Lower Snake River Dams to aid in Salmon recovery, I recommend reading these two items, which provide some historical insight with respect to salmon numbers:

1. Chapman, D.W. (1986). “Salmon and Steelhead Abundance in the Columbia River in the Nineteenth Century,” Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, 115:662-670.

2. McDonald, Marshall (1894). Report of the United States Commissioner of Fish and Fisheries on Investigations in the Columbia River Basin In Regard to the Salmon Fisheries, Government Printing Office, Washington D.C.

Chapman’s article contains an interesting graph of “Salmon Catch (Harvest) vs time (from about 1870 to 1970) as well as a listing of numerous other interesting references related to Salmon. The 'peak harvest year' occurred in the 1880's and has been in general trend of decline since then.....

McDonald’s 1894 report states that “there is no reason to doubt- indeed the fact is beyond question- that the number of salmon now reaching the head waters of streams in the Columbia River Basin is insignificant in comparison with the number which some years ago annually visited and spawned in these waters. It is further apparent that this decrease is not to be attributed either to the contraction of the area accessible to them or to changed conditions in the waters which would deter the salmon from entering them.”

To give some perspective, the problem of declining Salmon numbers was noted prior to 1900 and the first Lower Snake River project was completed in the early 1960’s; more than sixty years later.

One should wonder how their removal will solve a problem which was clearly noted six decades prior to their construction.....

GeneandCassie says...

Yep, back in the Goode Olde Daze of 2000, the proud chant was 'we-re #1!!!!! yea team!!!!'

http://www.bluefish.org/1most00.htm

Don't git no better than #1.......

GeneandCassie says...

Todaze question of note:

Does popping open a soda contribute to the climate problems????

Only The Shadow knows for shure....

http://www.livescience.com/32492-why-...

GeneandCassie says...

In this situation, somebody must have been asleep at the switch to miss a four month long water leak.....

A water leak for a few days is one thing; however a leak of water for a few months is another......

On the positive side, it was a transfer of water from underground to the surface and the leak probably augmented some surface stream somewhere in the valley and all the way down to the Pacific Ocean; aiding in keeping surface flows up.....

Perhaps a $$$ benefit can be claimed from this aspect of the overall situation?????

GeneandCassie says...

Chicken Little probably summed it all up best.......

Or maybe it was the one who once muttered Eat, Drink, and Be Merry.......

The money redistribution thing sounds like a new version of Ye Olde Shell Game
.....

GeneandCassie says...

This is where the going gets 'tough,' reducing carbon use yet at the same time holding conferences where people have to use carbon to attend; unless perhaps Olde Nellie is saddled up and rode back to the 'other Washington' while the supplies are hauled along by Oxen and wagons.....:

http://citizensclimatelobby.org/2015-...

Would a totally 'virtual conference' be a better option here; for helping out the climate change situation by reducing Carbon based Fuel use?????

GeneandCassie says...

Reminds one of Barnum and Bailey side shows.......

Step right up, pay $10 here to see the Egress; the entry to the Egress is right through this door.....

Step right up; Pay $10 to see the Egress......

Should provide steady jobs to those processing the continuous revenue refunds being made back to the eager populace.....

Not owning a vehicle and converting from carbon fuel based appliances/furnaces to all electric cooking and heating should work wonders too.....

GeneandCassie says...

I understand the Port has been doing research on water conservation techniques; perhaps they can weigh in also on this topic of interest.....

GeneandCassie says...

Numerous references, generally Federal Reports written during the mid- to late-1800's, are available; and they generally describe conditions encountered in the region with respect to Salmon and other features; such as vegetation and water temperatures.

Fremont, in 1843, mentioned the area he passed through near Walla Walla as being 'quite smoky' and that it was difficult to get long views with his viewing scopes.

A map of the 'Natural Limits of the Distribution of the Salmon' from the 1890's interestingly left out the lower Mill Creek and lower Walla Walla basins and other reports of the era describe the difficulty of finding salmon in the local streams.

This article, which should be available at local libraries, has a good bibliography/list of references, which provide further reading on the subject of Salmon in the region:

Chapman, D.W. (1986). “Salmon and Steelhead Abundance in the Columbia River in the Nineteenth Century,” Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, 115:662-670.

Some older reports mention the sparseness of the vegetation in the area and difficulty in finding firewood in the mid to late 1800's......

GeneandCassie says...

Given the renewed interest in removing the four Lower Snake River Dams to aid in Salmon recovery, I recommend reading these two items, which provide some historical insight with respect to salmon numbers:

1. Chapman, D.W. (1986). “Salmon and Steelhead Abundance in the Columbia River in the Nineteenth Century,” Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, 115:662-670.

2. McDonald, Marshall (1894). Report of the United States Commissioner of Fish and Fisheries on Investigations in the Columbia River Basin In Regard to the Salmon Fisheries, Government Printing Office, Washington D.C.

Chapman’s article contains an interesting graph of “Salmon Catch (Harvest) vs time (from about 1870 to 1970) as well as a listing of numerous other interesting references related to Salmon.

McDonald’s 1894 report states that “there is no reason to doubt- indeed the fact is beyond question- that the number of salmon now reaching the head waters of streams in the Columbia River Basin is insignificant in comparison with the number which some years ago annually visited and spawned in these waters. It is further apparent that this decrease is not to be attributed either to the contraction of the area accessible to them or to changed conditions in the waters which would deter the salmon from entering them.”

To give some perspective, the problem of declining Salmon numbers was noted prior to 1900 and the first Lower Snake River project was completed in the early 1960’s; more than sixty years later.