Comment history

GeneandCassie says...

Definitely sounds like a Cash Cow ready to be milked.....

Hopefully the pair hailing from Northglenn, Colorado; (or are they Pennsylvanians??) will weigh in again also on this topic......

Pennies falling from heaven and a chicken in every pot........

GeneandCassie says...

My Dentist keeps saying that my gums are in recession......

Could this be the big one a-coming??????

At one time, Recess was the best sounding word in the dictionary......

On Letter - Another recession will be coming

Posted 31 August 2015, 4:18 p.m. Suggest removal

GeneandCassie says...

It all brings back memories of song lyrics from ages past.......

One song went 'Smoke, Smoke, Smoke that cigarette...... Puff, Puff, Puff.......'

The other song went 'And they called him the Streak, fastest thing on two feet.......'

Them waz the daze fer shure.........

GeneandCassie says...

The brief discussion about 'Hades' is in this Federal report:

Symons, Lieut. Thomas W. (1882). “Report of an Examination of the Upper Columbia River and the Territory in its Vicinity,” Forty-seventh Congress, 1st session, Document Number 186, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington D.C.

It was located somewhere in the vicinity of the Snake/Columbia River confluence; likely underwater now.....

There was quite a bit of 'exploring' going on in the Columbia/Snake Basins back in the 1870's to 1890's; regarding/related to the 'salmon declines' being noted back then; about 80 years prior to the Lower Snake Project construction.....

GeneandCassie says...

The title of the original article posted contained the word 'husband-ry' and I figured the word 'wife-ry' perhaps needed equal time in this modern world.......

Didn't expect any 'surprises' on this but such is life in the 2000's........

GeneandCassie says...

I have not researched the basic reasons for the 'smoke' noted in 1843 or 1849; if it all was due to things 'human' or things 'natural'........

Just interesting to read that things might have not been 100% hunky-dory and 'pristine' in ages past and to also read in various journals that the area might have not been a 'natural garden of Eden' but instead might have been a tad arid and perhaps a windblown dusty place to live in......

One local settlement supposedly even had the name of 'Hades' until the residents apparently decided to change the name to something more enticing to new settlers...... but I reckon that 'Hades' was chosen initially for a reason.......

GeneandCassie says...

What the hey?????? Looks like even back in the mid 1800's things were a tad smoky in ye olde local atmosphere.....

Based from what 'people with boots on the ground' back then recorded in their journals......

GeneandCassie says...

A couple of references do mention 'smoke' in the area back prior to 1850.....

In the 1840's, two military expeditions passed through the Columbia Basin region near Walla Walla; one led by Capt John C. Fremont in 1843 and one in 1849 under Col William W. Loring. Memories of these expeditions are preserved for us in "A Report of the Exploring Expedition to Oregon and North California, in the Years 1843-1844," by Capt John Fremont; and in the book "The March of the Mounted Riflemen, First United States Military Expedition to Travel the Full Length of the Oregon Trail from Fort Leavenworth to Fort Vancouver, May to October 1849," edited by Raymond W. Settle and dated 1940.

It is interesting that the documented accounts of the expeditions both mention smoke being present in the region. For example, on October 22, 1843; while viewing the Walla Walla valley from a vantage point in the Blue Mountains, an entry states that "the weather was smoky and unfavorable to far views with the glass." In 1849, accounts of smoke start around August 15 east of Fort Boise and continue well into September. On September 2, in the vicinity of the Malheur River, the account reads "the morning was very smoky which prevented us from catching our mules and leaving before eight o'clock." On September 14, in the vicinity of The Dalles, the account reads "we were prevented from seeing any distance by the constant clouds of smoke which so filled the atmosphere that is was impossible to see."

Where there is smoke, there might also be fire.......... maybe husband-ry; but maybe wife-ry too????.......

GeneandCassie says...

A couple of references do mention 'smoke' in the area back in the mid 1800's.....

In the 1840's, two military expeditions passed through the Columbia Basin region near Walla Walla; one led by Capt John C. Fremont in 1843 and one in 1849 under Col William W. Loring. Memories of these expeditions are preserved for us in "A Report of the Exploring Expedition to Oregon and North California, in the Years 1843-1844," by Capt John Fremont; and in the book "The March of the Mounted Riflemen, First United States Military Expedition to Travel the Full Length of the Oregon Trail from Fort Leavenworth to Fort Vancouver, May to October 1849," edited by Raymond W. Settle and dated 1940.

It is interesting that the documented accounts of the expeditions both mention smoke being present in the region. For example, on October 22, 1843; while viewing the Walla Walla valley from a vantage point in the Blue Mountains, an entry states that "the weather was smoky and unfavorable to far views with the glass." In 1849, accounts of smoke start around August 15 east of Fort Boise and continue well into September. On September 2, in the vicinity of the Malheur River, the account reads "the morning was very smoky which prevented us from catching our mules and leaving before eight o'clock." On September 14, in the vicinity of The Dalles, the account reads "we were prevented from seeing any distance by the constant clouds of smoke which so filled the atmosphere that is was impossible to see."

GeneandCassie says...

Maybe doing a correlation between the world's consumption of beans and global warming is in order......

Hearken back to a movie about a Sheriff and a campfire scene featuring consumption of beans......